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Posts Tagged ‘Unum offsets’

Credible sources continue to report that Unum/Lucens continues to hunt down every nickel and dime associated with SSDI and other monthly earnings offsets including Retirement Income. The process is somewhat convoluted since Unum never proves what is owed, and asks for the same amount of overpayment from every claimant.

The process begins with a request from Lucens, Unum’s third-party paper chaser of SSDI Authorizations, and ends with a overpayment of $696, the same for everyone regardless of the disclosed actual amount alleged to be owed. Although DCS does not recommend signing any SSDI file Authorizations, Unum still requests SSDI 1099s which are recommended to provide to Unum.

Nevertheless, it appears Unum is targeting claims paid for a long-time in hopes of coming up with overpayments it can collect. What is Unum looking for? Increases in SSDI benefits due to additional income, miscalculations of SSDI offsets, retirement income that was never offset, workers’ compensation omissions etc. And, they are harassing claimants, even those with maximum duration and closed claims to repay amounts alleged to be due.

My beef with Unum is that it does not have the authority to arbitrarily calculate a overpayment and offset or reduce benefits to $0 without first showing calculations and proving to the claimants’ satisfaction that amounts alleged are actually due. Unum doesn’t do that. It simply calculates the overpayment and then offsets from benefits.

What is also suspicious is that regardless of Unum’s allegations of large overpayments due, the company always seems to come up with $696 due because Unum “is so gracious and forgiving of the remainder of the debt.” (Paraphrased) What? Why go through all the bother of targeting and recalculating for offsets and then only ask for $696 back?

This is actually an ingenious psychological plan on Unum’s part. Individuals I’ve spoken to in this situation say, “Oh, thank goodness, I only owe $696. I don’t mind paying that back”, or “You only pick the battles you can win, right?” ¬†Oh boy! It seems that claimants are often all too ready to jump right in and pay the $696 alleged overpayment rather than the few thousand dollars alleged. Clever isn’t it?

Most of you know I’m a contract specialist, and I’d be willing to say that in a large number of cases, claimant recalculations of pre-disability monthly earnings, residual disability under WIB or PPL, COLA, indexing etc. might actually prove Unum owes claimants money back and not the other way around.

Of those client claims I’ve actually investigated and calculated myself I found overwhelmingly large numbers of claims where Unum’s figures for pre-disability earnings and indexing were grossly inaccurate. I doubt if you could actually find a Unum claims handler today who knows how to perform the calculations for indexing, COLA and WIB or PPL part-time earnings. Supposedly, claims reps send files to the financial department for calculations, but they cannot explain anything to claimants who call for an explanation.

Bottom line, when faced with a $696 overpayment letter, it might be helpful to claimants to do a few recalculations themselves to determine whether they’ve been paid correctly elsewhere in the policy. It might be possible that Unum owes YOU and not the other way around, even subtracting the $696 alleged due by Unum.

The process of “forgiving” alleged overpayments except for $696 for everyone is deceptive particularly when Unum never has to show calculations or prove what’s owed, and people are enticed to pay the lesser amount in lieu of what’s actually owed.

In my opinion, it’s a “nickel and dime” scheme that’s deceptive.

 

 

 

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